A 2012 blog post

:: foo, bar, tag with spaces, baz

Here is an example blog post.

Everything after this paragraph “after the break”. On index pages and Atom feeds, it will become “Continue reading…”, if you configure them to include only the summary “blurb” before the break.

some code

Here’s some Bullshit Ipsum.

Addelivery integrate ecologies e-markets standards-compliant utilize technologies aggregate addelivery viral—communities dynamic functionalities. Mindshare engineer viral A-list: cross-platform remix engage social cross-media social innovate distributed matrix experiences monetize utilize innovative. Action-items transition recontextualize sexy Cluetrain envisioneer, “vortals communities evolve technologies sexy methodologies.” Enhance grow compelling iterate architect matrix plug-and-play reinvent scale, distributed incentivize, extend.

Revolutionary proactive. Target; envisioneer e-services sticky robust morph users methodologies, markets content supply-chains, granular monetize reinvent harness initiatives. Plug-and-play productize vortals integrate compelling aggregate, user-contributed, integrate web-enabled grow extend mindshare, repurpose world-class harness next-generation eyeballs solutions blogospheres extend. Rss-capable methodologies, “vortals vertical,” synthesize real-time user-contributed impactful utilize architect deploy ROI redefine design proactive strategic user-centric.

Here’s a footnote1.

Code blocks

Frog optionally uses Pygments if it’s installed to do syntax highlighting. In your markdown using backtick code blocks you can specify a language:

```language
some racket code
```

That name is given to Pygments as the lexer to use.

For example this:

```js
/**
 * Some JavaScript
 */
function foo()
{
    if (counter <= 10)
        return;
    // it works!
```

Yields this:

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/**
 * Some JavaScript
 */
function foo()
{
    if (counter <= 10)
        return;
    // it works!

And this:

```racket
#lang racket
;; Finds Racket sources in all subdirs
(for ([path (in-directory)])
  (when (regexp-match? #rx"[.]rkt$" path)
    (printf "source file: ~a\n" path)))
(symbol->string 'foo)
```

Yields this:

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#lang racket
;; Finds Racket sources in all subdirs
(for ([path (in-directory)])
  (when (regexp-match? #rx"[.]rkt$" path)
    (printf "source file: ~a\n" path)))
(symbol->string 'foo)

Notice that, for Racket, symbols with unambiguous documentation (provided by one library, or provided by several where one is racket or racket/base) are links to that documentation.

This also works outside fenced code blocks, for symbols in backticks immediately followed by [racket]. Example: printf. This isn’t official Markdown; it’s simply a pun on link syntax and fenced code block languages. This is similar to using @racket[printf] in Scribble.

symbol->string.

Here is a lambda: λ.

Here is a lambda in code backticks: λ.

And here in indented code block:

(λ () #t)

And here in fenced code block, no lang specified:

(λ () #t)

And here in fenced code block, lang = racket:

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(λ () #t)

And here in fenced code block, lang = scheme:

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(λ () #t)

Here’s a simple for macro, written in Racket:

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(define-syntax-rule (for (x e1) e2)
  (for-each (λ (x) e2) e1))

The end.

  1. Footnote definition.